Hungarian prime minister viktor orban immigration, globalism and gender fluidity

Hungarian prime minister viktor orban

Hungarian prime minister viktor orban

After the backlash from his “mixed race” speech, Orbán gets a warm welcome at CPAC.

The Hungarian prime minister was criticized for a speech he gave on July 23. This speech showed how the American right is becoming more nationalistic and populist.

At the Conservative Political Action Conference in Texas, Viktor Orbán took the stage and invited the American right to join him.

Orbán, the Hungarian prime minister, said, “I’m here to tell you that we should join forces.” Orbán is becoming more and more distant from democratic countries in Europe because he opposes immigration and liberal ideas about family and gender, and more and more close to the MAGA-aligned American right.

As he said that the “West is at war with itself,” the far-right leader railed against immigration, globalism, and gender fluidity. He also said that an ideological “battle for Western civilization” would be fought in Washington and Brussels.

“All the globalists can go to hell,” Orbán said to loud cheers. “I’m here in Texas.”

Orbán was one of the first people to speak at the three-day conference. His speech comes after the prime minister got a lot of criticism from around the world for saying on July 23 that Hungary shouldn’t become a “mixed-race” country and pointing to other countries in Europe with large immigrant populations. One of Orbán’s closest advisers quit because of what he said. He said that his speech sounded like it was given by a “Nazi.”

But, as expected, Orbán was welcomed by American activists inside a half-empty convention hall at the start of CPAC. These activists didn’t know much about Orbán’s policy of increasing government spending to promote traditional marriage and encourage people to have more children, but they were interested in it.

Trump meets with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban

“All the globalists can go to hell,” Orbán said to loud cheers. “I’m here in Texas.”

Orbán was one of the first people to speak at the three-day conference. His speech comes after the prime minister got a lot of criticism from around the world for saying on July 23 that Hungary shouldn’t become a “mixed-race” country and pointing to other countries in Europe with large immigrant populations. One of Orbán’s closest advisers quit because of what he said. He said that his speech sounded like it was given by a “Nazi.”

But, as expected, Orbán was welcomed by American activists inside a half-empty convention hall at the start of CPAC. These activists didn’t know much about Orbán’s policy of increasing government spending to promote traditional marriage and encourage people to have more children, but they were interested in it.

Orbán: U.S. has put Europe under ‘ideological pressure’

Insofar as CPAC events are a chance to talk about new ideas in conservative politics with loyal Republicans, there are signs that a growing number of politicians on the right are embracing a type of politics called “nationalistic populism.” This type of politics wants to increase government spending to make life easier for people with children, while also condemning same-sex families, transgender rights, and open borders.

Orbán said, “Politics alone are not enough.” “This war is a battle over culture. We need to bring our churches, families, universities, and community institutions back to life.

Before the conference, CPAC’s organizers didn’t rush to defend Orbán’s comments about race, but they did make it clear that the Hungarian prime minister was still welcome at their Dallas event. After Orbán’s controversial comments, Matt Schlapp, the head of the American Conservative Union, which puts on CPAC, said that the conference would “let the man speak.”

Schlapp and his group, like Tucker Carlson and other right-wing commentators in the United States, have become friendly with Orbán and his government in Hungary. In May, the first CPAC conference was held in Hungary. Former President Donald Trump spoke to the crowd via video. Trump invited Orbán to his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey, on Tuesday and called him a “friend.”

Ede and Lilla Vessey are a married couple who live in Dallas. On Thursday, they wore “Hungary” T-shirts to CPAC as a tribute to their home country.

Hungary’s PM Viktor Orbán’s full Opening Speech at the 2022 CPAC Conference in Dallas, Texas

Ede Vessey said that the response to Orbán’s “mixed-race” comments was “a little bit overblown.” He said that the prime minister was talking about a stark clash of cultures that has happened in some Western European countries that have taken in refugees from mostly Muslim countries.

Lilla Vessey said, “Hungary is a really small country, and you can’t really compare it to the U.S.” “It’s not quite the same.”

They praised the way Hungary’s government helps young couples get married. This is one way Orbán’s government is trying to increase the birth rate, and they said conservatives in the US should do the same. Some Republican politicians, like Ohio Senate candidate J.D. Vance, who is one of the speakers at CPAC Texas, are starting to push for bigger tax credits for families with children. This includes Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who says he is working to pass a law that will give more government resources to new mothers.

Lilla Vessey said, “This is why Mr. Orbán is so popular there: he is good with families.” “We were just in Budapest, and everyone there likes him a lot.”

Even though most of the rest of the European Union doesn’t like Orbán, he has a lot of support in Hungary, where his political party has built its own media empire with help from the government. Since coming back to power a decade ago, the Hungarian prime minister has built strong ties with Russia and China. This is different from his European colleagues and NATO allies, who are trying to put strict sanctions on Russia because of its war with Ukraine.

But even some of Orbán’s closest conservative allies didn’t immediately defend him after his latest comments.

Of course, most people who go to CPAC aren’t avid readers of Hungarian news or experts on Orbán’s ideas. In some cases, recent news stories were scary.

“I don’t know everything he says, but it had something to do with race. Barbara Chapman, who lives in Texas, said before Orbán’s speech, “You know, I think that makes us look bad.”

“We have Republicans of different races. I really want to see Dr. Ben Carson speak, you know. I don’t think it should be limited to only white people. We need people of Asian, Hispanic, Black, and white backgrounds,” she said.

But after Orbán’s speech, Chapman changed her mind. In a text message, she said that the news media had misrepresented Orbán’s views.

“Overall, I liked him,” Chapman wrote of the prime minister, calling him “charming.”

Andrew Sweet, who was at the conference from New Jersey, said that giving Orbán a stage did not mean that CPAC fully agreed with his ideas. But Sweet, who calls himself a “centrist” in the party, warned that Republicans shouldn’t take any nationalist approach that tries to make the country the same in terms of race or beliefs.

“I think it’s good to have more different kinds of people,” Sweet said. “More voices, more experiences, and other stuff.”

But Sweet said that doesn’t mean Republicans can’t listen to conservatives who have taken a different path.

“It’s one thing to be like, and here’s a conservative example from Hungary,” said Sweet. “It’s something else to agree with everything he’s about to say. It’s a little different, you know.”

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